Cruising and Navigation Association of New Zealand

Archive for October, 2014

Coastal CLASSIC 2014

This is a copy of posts to FaceBook by Georgina Griffiths of MetService (our annual dinner guest speaker this year) :

MetService New Zealand

 

An update for the Coastal Classic yacht race: ‪#‎coastalclassic‬
A cold front crosses the fleet just after 1pm tomorrow (Friday), backing and strengthening the wind. Wind barbs (knots) shown at 1km model resolution, for 10am (left hand side) and 1pm (right hand side) Friday show WSW 15-18kt winds for the start, strengthening to 28-30kt and gusty for a time with the front. Good luck to all the boats! Keep up to date with the marine forecast on VHF or http://www.metservice.com/marine-surf/recreational-marine/auckland or download the FREE marine App at http://about.metservice.com/our-company/ways-to-get-the-weather/weather-on-your-/smartphone-apps/ ^GG

An update for the Coastal Classic yacht race: #coastalclassic  
A cold front crosses the fleet just after 1pm tomorrow (Friday), backing and strengthening the wind.  Wind barbs (knots) shown at 1km model resolution, for 10am (left hand side) and 1pm (right hand side) Friday show WSW 15-18kt winds for the start, strengthening to 28-30kt and gusty for a time with the front. Good luck to all the boats!  Keep up to date with the marine forecast on VHF or http://www.metservice.com/marine-surf/recreational-marine/auckland or download the FREE marine App at http://about.metservice.com/our-company/ways-to-get-the-weather/weather-on-your-/smartphone-apps/ ^GG

 

Sailing the ‪#‎coastalclassic‬ on Friday? A cold front will cross the fleet early in the race, strengthening those SW winds fairly soon after the start. And keep up with the latest forecasts, since the forecast SE change later on that night/overnight up that coastline brings in some very cold air – and the risk of a pressure kick. Details at http://about.metservice.com/homepagerss/ or ask here ^GG

Sailing the #coastalclassic on Friday? A cold front will cross the fleet early in the race, stengthening those SW winds fairly soon after the start.  And keep up with the latest forecasts, since the forecast SE change later on that night/overnight up that coastline brings in some very cold air - and the risk of a pressure kick. Details at http://about.metservice.com/homepagerss/ or ask here ^GG

Advertisements

Five Sailing "Galley Secrets"

Five Sailing “Galley Secrets” for Cruising Sailors

Printer-Friendly Format

 

From http://www.skippertips.com/public/883.cfm

Cooking in a small boat galley can be a tough challenge in a seaway. But tasty, nutritious food will boost the energy and morale of your sailing crew or partner sky-high! Follow these five sea-tested secrets for success to save time and energy–wherever you choose to sail or cruise.

1. Begin with “First Day” Bland Foods.

Crew and cooks often don’t feel so well the first couple of days. Prepare two days worth of bland food ahead of time. Stay away from heavy cream sauces or fried foods. Stuff zip-lock bags with raw veggies like sliced carrots, celery sticks, or cucumber.

Pasta eaten cooked with just a bit of salt for flavor works well to tame a seasick tummy. Stay away from greasy toppings like spaghetti sauce. That will come later on in the trip. For now, try just plain pasta to keep your energy up and help keep mal-de-mar away.

Need a fast “on the go” high energy snack for rough weather or watches? Mix nuts, seeds, and dried fruit for energy boosting trail mix. Make finger food out of meats; slice it into cubes.

2. Pull out Ingredients from the Get-go.

Before you open the first can, pull everything you need to make, mix, and serve the meal. Include pots, pans and ladles for cooking and plates, bowls, and silverware for serving. If you need to add “zing” to your food with spices, pull the bottles out of cupboards and lockers before you start to cook.

3. Keep “Clean-ups” Organized.

Think about where those dirty pots and pans will go when you’re done. Forget most galley sinks. Unless you’re fortunate to have super deep, double sinks, you will run out of room fast. Use large, deep buckets 1/3 full of sea water (for ballast) to hold your dirty pots, pans, and dishes.

4. Put the “Brakes” on Slippery Serving-ware.

Dampen towels or rags and lay them all onto the opposite counter or a table. Otherwise, plates and bowls will skid across slippery surfaces like a raw oyster on a slide. Acclaimed author and veteran cruiser John Vigor puts a bead of rubber cement on the bottom of plates and bowls. Once dry, it grips any slick surface like a barnacle on a boat bottom.

5. Practice Safety First and Foremost.

Strap yourself with a wide galley-belt, hooked on to strong pad eyes that span the boat galley. When heeling or pitching, this will keep you in place. Keep a charged fire extinguisher or fire blanket close at hand.

Wear a high topped full length apron to protect you from splashing liquids. The old standard was to wear high topped foul weather pants (chest highs with suspenders) to protect you from splashes in the galley. Today’s synthetic foul weather gear could be dangerous if it caught fire. Wear the apron instead.

Don’t pour from a pot or pan–use a ladle or spoon the food into bowls. Pick up a cup or mug before you pour coffee or tea from a pot. This helps synchronize the motion of the cup with the spout.

Cooking in a seaway will exhaust even the most experienced sailor. Learn to prepare, cook and serve a “one potter”. This applies in particular to folks that like to sail as crew. Think of a meal that you could you make that requires just one deep pot (or even a pressure cooker) from start to finish.

Soups and stews are always welcome, as are chilli or pasta dishes. These are perfect one-pot meals. Pick one and master it. My own specialty was breakfast–in particular omelets. When you contact the skipper, let him or her know your specialty in the galley so they can put the ingredients on the provisions list. Learn a one-pot recipe to become an instant hit with the hungry crew.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Use these sailing tips in your small sailboat galley the next time you cast off for coastal or offshore cruising. Save time and energy and keep your hungry sailing crew satisfied–wherever in the world you choose to sail or cruise!


Sailing Tips Forum (13 Oct)

CANANZ SAILING TIPS PANEL/FORUM 13 Oct 2014

http://www.cananz.org.nz— blogs at https://cananz.wordpress.com/

1. Weather and Passage Planning (Bob McDavitt , also MC for the meeting )

http://tinyurl.com/ecaus –> http://www.zygrib.org –> PredictWind/MetService

Scale from outside in: Consider rain, then wind, then swell, then tide. Have an “onshore buddy”.

2. BOAT and SAIL Set-up (Basil Orr, Tony Whiting (Akarana Pacific/Whiting Projects, and Penny)

Basil described a FLOPPER STOPPER (http://www.cruisingworld.com/how/reduce-boat-roll-flopper-stoppers) for a good night’s sleep in a rolly anchorage.

Tony showed the setup of Taranui III which sailed to Vanuatu last year. 3 roller-furlers. Specially designed so that sailing can be done from the cockpit, no need to go on foredeck. Single line reefing of main. Reduce main chaffing by using small batons.

Tony showed a diagram of his revolutionary Boom Preventer system. With a couple of pieces of rope and a boom vang strap this can prevent those unwanted gybes and wild swings of the boom. It steadies the boat and stops the rolling. It does slow the gybes, so may need modification on keel boats with a large mainsail.

Other tips: Choose a sail setting that is easy to control. Flat in light/strong winds, full sail only in moderate winds. Keep the rail clear of water – a flat boat is a fast boat.

Upwind: Take a heading that lets you feel the tug on the boat then go to windward when the tug increases, being mindful to prevent an unwanted tack.

image

A light touch should be all that is needed

Reduce or reef sails early enough to keep the boat sailing with minimum heel. Think of reefing as a balance tactic. Increase weight to windward.

3. When things go wrong (Paul Leppington -lecturer at NZ Maritime School, ex Senior Master/Director Spirit of Adventure Trust).

Paul delighted us with stories of personal experience of how easy things can go wrong and how to react – to galley fires and almost washing onto rocks. Buy the biggest fire extinguisher you can get. Invest in three (or four) emergency position beacons on various systems (GPS/Iridium/Russian/AIS/Galileo) so they can all be going at once.

Other tips: Flotation devices—what is the law now? All boats are to carry adequate PFD (Personal Flotation device) for each person on board + in Hauraki Gulf, for boats less than 6m, the onus is on the skipper.

Before departure: Check stanchions and cotter pins are in order, there are no hooks or snags, no loose lock-nuts.

Visitors briefing before departure— Cover Radio, “Man overboard”, what to do in a Tack/gybe, respect the boom, keep loose lines and ropes away from the prop.

Tools: In the high seas—a battery driven rotary cutter/angle grinder is best for cutting lines if mast breaks.

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>